Defences


Future defences


Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 19 octobre 2018, 09h30, Salle 580F (salle des thèses), Bâtiment Halle aux Farines
Marie Kerjean (IRIF) Reflexive spaces of smooth functions: a logical account for linear partial differential equations

Around the Curry-Howard correspondence, proof-theory has grown along two distinct fields: the theory of programming languages, for which formulas acts as data types, and the semantic study of proofs. The latter consists in giving mathematical models of proofs and programs. In particular, denotational semantics distinguishes data types which serves as input or output of programs, and allows in return for a finer understanding of proofs and programs. Linear Logic (LL) gives a logical interpretation of the basic notions of linear algebra, while Differential Linear Logic allows for a logical understanding of differentiation.

This manuscript strengthens the link between proof-theory and functional analysis, and highlights the role of linear involutive negation in DiLL. The first part of this thesis consists in an overview of prerequisites on the notions of linearity, polarisation and differentiation in proof-theory, and gives the necessary background in the theory of locally convex topological vector spaces. The second part uses two standard topologies on the dual of a topological vector space and gives two models of DiLL: the weak topology allows only for a discrete interpretation of proofs through formal power series, while the Mackey topology on the dual allows for a smooth and polarised model of DiLL. Finally, the third part interprets proofs of DiLL by distributions. We detail a polarized model of DiLL in which negatives are Fr\'echet Nuclear spaces, and proofs are distributions with compact support. We show that solving linear partial differential equations with constant coefficients can be typed by a syntax similar to the one of DiLL, which we detail.


Past defences


Soutenances de thèses
jeudi 27 septembre 2018, 15h30, Salle 470E, Bâtiment Halle aux Farines
Pablo Rotondo (IRIF) Probabilistic studies in Number Theory and Word Combinatorics: instances of dynamical analysis

Dynamical Analysis incorporates tools from dynamical systems, namely the Transfer Operator, into the framework of Analytic Combinatorics, permitting the analysis of numerous algorithms and objects naturally associated with an underlying dynamical system. This dissertation presents, in the integrated framework of Dynamical Analysis, the probabilistic analysis of seemingly distinct problems in a unified way: the probabilistic study of the recurrence function of Sturmian words, and the probabilistic study of the Continued Logarithm algorithm.

Sturmian words are a fundamental family of words in Word Combinatorics. They are in a precise sense the simplest infinite words that are not eventually periodic. Sturmian words have been well studied over the years, notably by Morse and Hedlund (1940) who demonstrated that they present a notable number theoretical characterization as discrete codings of lines with irrational slope, relating them naturally to dynamical systems, in particular the Euclidean dynamical system. These words have never been studied from a probabilistic perspective. Here, we quantify the recurrence properties of a “random” Sturmian word, which are dictated by the so-called “recurrence function”; we perform a complete asymptotic probabilistic study of this function, quantifying its mean and describing its distribution under two different probabilistic models, which present different virtues: one is a naturaly choice from an algorithmic point of view (but is innovative from the point of view of dynamical analysis), while the other allows a natural quantification of the worst-case growth of the recurrence function. We discuss the relation between these two distinct models and their respective techniques, explaining also how the two seemingly different techniques employed could be linked through the use of the Mellin transform. In this dissertation we also discuss our ongoing work regarding two special families of Sturmian words: those associated with a quadratic irrational slope, and those with a rational slope (not properly Sturmian). Our work seems to show the possibility of a unified study.

The Continued Logarithm Algorithm, introduced by Gosper in Hakmem (1978) as a mutation of classical continued fractions, computes the greatest common divisor of two natural numbers by performing division-like steps involving only binary shifts and substractions. Its worst-case performance was studied recently by Shallit (2016), who showed a precise upper-bound for the number of steps and gave a family of inputs attaining this bound. In this dissertation we employ dynamical analysis to study the average running time of the algorithm, giving precise mathematical constants for the asymptotics, as well as other parameters of interest. The underlying dynamical system is akin to the Euclidean one, and was first studied by Chan (around 2005) from an ergodic, but the presence of powers of 2 in the quotients ingrains into the central parameters a dyadic flavour that cannot be grasped solely by studying this system. We thus introduce a dyadic component and deal with a two-component system. With this new mixed system at hand, we then provide a complete average-case analysis of the algorithm by Dynamical Analysis.

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 25 septembre 2018, 14h00, Salle 3052, Bâtiment Sophie Germain
Yann Hamdaoui (IRIF) Concurrency, References and Linear Logic

The topic of this thesis is the study of the encoding of references and concurrency in Linear Logic. Our perspective is to demonstrate the capability of Linear Logic to encode side-effects to make it a viable, formalized and well studied compilation target for functional languages in the future. The key notion we develop is that of routing areas: a family of proof nets which correspond to a fragment of differential linear logic and which implements communication primitives. We develop routing areas as a parametrizable device and study their theory. We then illustrate their expressivity by translating a concurrent λ-calculus featuring concurrency, references and replication to a fragment of differential nets. To this purpose, we introduce a language akin to Amadio’s concurrent λ-calculus, but with explicit substitutions for both variables and references. We endow this language with a type and effect system and we prove termination of well-typed terms by a mix of reducibility and a new interactive technique. This intermediate language allows us to prove a simulation and an adequacy theorem for the translation.

Soutenances de thèses
jeudi 20 septembre 2018, 10h00, 1828 (Olympe de Gouges)
Matthieu Boutier () Routage sensible à la source

En routage next-hop, paradigme de routage utilisé dans l'Internet Global, chaque routeur choisit le next-hop de chaque paquet en fonction de son adresse destination. Le routage sensible à la source est une extension compatible du routage next-hop où le choix du next-hop dépend de l'adresse source du paquet en plus de son adresse destination. Nous montrons dans cette thèse que le routage sensible à la source est adapté au routage des réseaux multihomés avec plusieurs adresses, qu'il est possible d'étendre de manière compatible les protocoles de routage à vecteur de distance existants et que ce paradigme de routage offre avantageusement plus de flexibilité aux hôtes. Nous montrons d'abord que certains systèmes n'ordonnent pas correctement les entrées sensibles à la source dans leurs tables de routage et nous définissons un algorithme adapté aux protocoles de routage pour y remédier. Nous montrons comment étendre les protocoles à vecteur de distances au routage sensible à la source de manière compatible. Nous validons notre approche en concevant une extension d'un protocole existant (Babel), en réalisant la première implémentation complète d'un protocole sensible à la source et en utilisant ce protocole pour router un réseau multihomé. Enfin, nous montrons que le routage sensible à la source offre des possibilités de multichemin aux couches supérieures des hôtes. Nous vérifions qu'il s'intègre aux technologies existantes (MPTCP) et nous concevons des techniques d'optimisation pour les applications légères. Nous évaluons ces techniques après les avoir implémentées dans le cadre d'une application existante (mosh).

Soutenances de thèses
mercredi 19 septembre 2018, 14h00, Salle 3052, Bâtiment Sophie Germain
Laurent Feuilloley (IRIF) Certification locale en calcul distribué : sensibilité aux erreurs, uniformité, redondance et interactivité

Cette thèse porte sur la notion de certification locale, un sujet central en décision distribuée, un domaine du calcul distribué. Le mécanisme de la décision distribuée consiste, pour les nœuds d'un réseau, à décider de manière distribuée si le réseau est dans une configuration correcte ou non, selon un certain prédicat. Cette décision est dite locale, car les nœuds du réseau ne peuvent communiquer qu'avec leurs voisins. Après avoir communiqué, chaque nœud prend une décision, exprimant si le réseau est correct ou non localement, c'est-à-dire correct étant donné l'information partielle récoltée jusque-là. Le réseau est déclaré correct globalement s'il est déclaré correct localement par tous les nœuds.

Du fait de la contrainte de localité, peu de prédicats peuvent être vérifiés de cette manière. La certification locale est un moyen de contourner cette difficulté, et permet de décider tous les prédicats. C'est un mécanisme qui consiste à étiqueter les nœuds du réseau avec ce que l'on appelle des certificats, qui peuvent être vérifiés localement par un algorithme distribué. Un schéma de certification locale est correct si seuls les réseaux dans une configuration correcte peuvent être certifiés. L'idée de la certification locale est non seulement séduisante d'un point de vue théorique, comme une forme de non-déterminisme distribué, mais c'est surtout un concept très utile pour l'étude des algorithmes tolérants aux pannes, où une étape-clé consiste à vérifier l'état du réseau en se basant sur des informations stockées par les nœuds.

Cette thèse porte sur quatre aspects de la certification locale : la sensibilité aux erreurs, l'uniformité, la redondance et l'interactivité. L'étude de ces quatre sujets est motivée par une question essentielle : comment réduire les ressources nécessaires à la certification et/ou permettre une meilleure tolérance aux pannes? Pour aborder cette question, il est nécessaire de comprendre le mécanisme de certification en profondeur. Dans cette optique, dans cette thèse, nous apportons des réponses aux questions suivantes. À quel point les certificats doivent-ils être redondants, pour assurer une certification correcte? Les schémas de certification classiques sont-ils robustes à un changement de la condition de correction? Le fait d'introduire de l'interactivité dans le processus change-t-il la complexité de la certification?

Mots-clefs: Calcul distribué sur réseau, décision distribuée, certification locale, schéma d'étiquetage de preuve, tolérance aux pannes.

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 18 septembre 2018, 14h00, 580F (Halle aux Farines)
Guillaume Claret (IRIF) Program in Coq

In this thesis, we develop new techniques to conveniently write formally verified programs. To proceed, we study the use of Coq as a programming language in different settings. Coq being a purely functional language, we mainly focus on the representation and on the specification of impure effects, like exceptions, mutable references, inputs-outputs, and concurrency.

First, we work on two preliminary projects helping us to understand the challenges of programming in Coq. The first project, Cybele, is a Coq plugin to write efficient proofs by reflection with effects. We compile and execute the impure effects in OCaml to generate a prophecy, a kind of certificate, and then interpret the effects in Coq using the prophecy. The second project, the compiler CoqOfOCaml, imports OCaml programs with effects into Coq, using an effect inference system.

Next, we describe different generic and composable representations of impure effects in Coq. The breakable computations combine the standard exceptions and mutable references effects, with a pause mechanism to make explicit the evaluation steps in order to represent the concurrent evaluation of two terms. By implementing the Pluto web server in Coq, we realize that the most important effects to program are the asynchronous inputs-outputs. Indeed, these effects are ubiquitous and cannot be encoded in a purely functional manner. Thus, we design the asynchronous computations as a first way to represent and compile programs with events and handlers in Coq.

Then, we study techniques to prove properties about programs with effects. We start with the verification of the blog system ChickBlog written in the language of the interactive computations. This blog runs one worker with synchronous inputs-outputs per client. We verify our blog using the method of specification by use cases. We adapt this technique to type theory by expressing a use case as a well-typed co-program over the program we verify. Thanks to this formalism, we can present a use case as a symbolic test program and symbolically debug it, step by step, using the interactive proof mode of Coq. To our knowledge, this is the first such adaptation of the use case specifications in type theory. We believe that the formal specification by use cases is one of the keys to verify effectful programs, as the method of use cases proved to be convenient to express (informal) specifications in the software industry. We extend our formalism to concurrent and potentially non-terminating programs with the language of concurrent computations. Apart from the use case method, we design a model-checker to verify the deadlock freeness of concurrent computations, by compiling the parallel composition to the non-deterministic choice operator.

Soutenances de thèses
lundi 10 septembre 2018, 14h00, Amphi Turing, Bâtiment Sophie Germain
Luca Reggio (IRIF) Quantifiers and duality

The unifying theme of the thesis is the semantic meaning of logical quantifiers. In their basic form quantifiers allow to state the existence, or non-existence, of individuals satisfying a property. As such, they encode the richness and the complexity of predicate logic, as opposed to propositional logic.

We contribute to the semantic understanding of quantifiers, from the viewpoint of duality theory, in three different areas of mathematics and theoretical computer science. First, in formal language theory through the syntactic approach provided by logic on words. Second, in intuitionistic propositional logic and in the study of uniform interpolation. Third, in categorical topology and categorical semantics for predicate logic.

Soutenances de thèses
jeudi 05 juillet 2018, 14h30, 580F (halle aux farines)
Guillaume Lagarde (IRIF) Contributions to Arithmetic Complexity and Compression

This thesis explores two territories of computer science: complexity and compression. More precisely, in a first part, we investigate the power of non-commutative arithmetic circuits, which compute multivariate non-commutative polynomials. For that, we in- troduce various models of computation that are restricted in the way they are allowed to compute monomials. These models generalize previous ones that have been widely studied, such as algebraic branching programs. The results are of three different types. First, we give strong lower bounds on the number of arithmetic operations needed to compute some polynomials such as the determinant or the permanent. Second, we design some deterministic polynomial-time algorithm to solve the white-box polynomial identity testing problem. Third, we exhibit a link between automata theory and non-commutative arithmetic circuits that allows us to derive some old and new tight lower bounds for some classes of non-commutative circuits, using a measure based on the rank of a so-called Hankel matrix. A second part is concerned with the analysis of the data compression algorithm called Lempel-Ziv. Although this algorithm is widely used in practice, we know little about its stability. Our main result is to show that an infinite word compressible by LZ’78 can become incompressible by adding a single bit in front of it, thus closing a question proposed by Jack Lutz in the late 90s under the name “one-bit catastrophe”. We also give tight bounds on the maximal possible variation between the compression ratio of a finite word and its perturbation—when one bit is added in front of it.

Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 27 avril 2018, 14h00, Salle 1021, Bâtiment Sophie Germain
Alex B. Grilo (IRIF) Quantum proofs, the Local Hamiltonian problem and applications

Manuscript is available here: https://www.irif.fr/~abgrilo/thesis.pdf

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 12 décembre 2017, 14h30, Salle 1009, Sophie Germain
Fabian Reiter (IRIF) Distributed Automata and Logic

Developing a descriptive complexity theory for distributed computing; that was the major motivation for my PhD thesis. To clarify what this means, I will first illustrate the principle of descriptive complexity using Fagin’s theorem, and then explain how that principle can be adapted to the setting of distributed computing. After that, I will present the two main contributions of my thesis: a class of distributed automata that is equivalent to monadic second-order logic on graphs, and another class that is equivalent to a small fragment of least fixpoint logic (more specifically, to a restricted variant of the modal μ-calculus that allows least fixpoints but forbids greatest fixpoints). In both cases, the considered model of distributed computing is based on finite-state machines.

Manuscript: https://www.irif.fr/~reiterf

Soutenances de thèses
jeudi 07 décembre 2017, 14h30, Amphi 10E, Halle aux Farines
Pierre Vial (IRIF) Non-idempotent typing operators, beyond the lambda-calculus

L'objet de cette thèse est l'extension des méthodes de la théorie des types intersections non-idempotents, introduite par Gardner et de Carvalho, à des cadres dépassant le lambda-calcul stricto sensu.

  • Nous proposons d'abord une caractérisation de la normalisation de tête et de la normalisation forte du lambda-mu calcul (déduction naturelle

classique) en introduisant des types unions non-idempotents. Comme dans le cas intuitionniste, la non-idempotence nous permet d'extraire du typage des informations quantitatives ainsi que des preuves de terminaison beaucoup plus élémentaires que dans le cas idempotent. Ces résultats nous conduisent à définir une variante à petits pas du lambda-mu-calcul, dans lequel la normalisation forte est aussi caractérisée avec des méthodes quantitatives.

  • Dans un deuxième temps, nous étendons la caractérisation de la normalisation faible dans le lambda-calcul pur à un lambda-calcul infinitaire étroitement lié aux arbres de Böhm et dû à Klop et al. Ceci donne une réponse positive à une question connue comme le problème de Klop. À cette fin, il est nécessaire d'introduire conjointement un système (système S) de types infinis utilisant une intersection que nous qualifions de séquentielle, et un critère de validité servant à se débarrasser des preuves dégénérées auxquelles les grammaires coinductives de types donnent naissance. Ceci nous permet aussi de donner une solution au problème n°20 de TLCA (caractérisation par les types des permutations héréditaires). Il est à noter que ces deux problèmes n'ont pas de solution dans le cas fini (Tatsuta, 2007).
  • Enfin, nous étudions le pouvoir expressif des grammaires coinductives de types, en dehors de tout critère de validité. Nous devons encore recourir au système S et ous montrons que tout terme est typable de façon non triviale avec des types infinis et que l'on peut extraire de ces typages des informations sémantiques comme l'ordre (arité) de n'importe quel lambda-terme. Ceci nous amène à introduire une méthode permettant de typer des termes totalement non-productifs, dits termes muets, inspirée de la logique du premier ordre. Ce résultat prouve que, dans l'extension coinductive du modèle relationnel, tout terme a une interprétation non vide. En utilisant une méthode similaire, nous montrons aussi que le système S collapse surjectivement sur l'ensemble des points de ce modèle.

https://www.irif.fr/~pvial/defense.htm

Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 01 décembre 2017, 14h30, Salle des Thèses, Halle aux Farines
Maxime Lucas (IRIF) Cubical categories for homotopy and rewriting

Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 17 novembre 2017, 15h15, Salle 153, Olympe de Gouges
Etienne Miquey (IRIF) Classical realizability and side-effects

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 14 novembre 2017, 11h00, Salle des Thèses, Halle aux Farines
Gabriel Radanne (IRIF) Tierless Web programming in ML

Eliom est un dialecte d’OCaml pour la programmation Web qui permet, à l’aide d’annotations syntaxiques, de déclarer code client et code serveur dans un même fichier. Ceci permet de construire une application complète comme un unique programme distribué dans lequel il est possible de définir des widgets aisément composables avec des comportements à la fois client et serveur. Eliom assure un bon comportement des communications grâce à un système de type et de nouvelles constructions adaptés à la programmation Web. De plus, Eliom est efficace : un découpage statique sépare les parties client et serveur durant la compilation et évite de trop nombreuses communications entre le client et le serveur. Enfin, Eliom supporte la modularité et l’encapsulation grâce à une extension du système de module d’OCaml permettant l’ajout d’annotations indiquant si une définition est présente sur le serveur, le client, ou les deux. Cette thèse présente la conception, la formalisation et l’implémention du langage Eliom.

https://www.irif.fr/~gradanne/phdthesis.html

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 27 juin 2017, 10h00, Salle 255, Olympe de Gouges
Amina Doumane (IRIF) On the infinitary proof theory of logics with fixed points

Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 09 décembre 2016, 14h00, Salle des Thèses, Halle aux Farines
Cyrille Chenavier (IRIF) Le treillis des opérateurs de réduction : applications aux bases de Gröbner non commutatives et en algèbre homologique

Soutenances de thèses
mardi 11 octobre 2016, 14h00, Salle 1006, Sophie Germain
Wenjie Fang (IRIF) Aspects énumératifs et bijectifs des cartes combinatoires : généralisation, unification et application

Le sujet de cette thèse est l'étude énumérative des cartes combinatoires et ses applications à l'énumération d’autres objets combinatoires.

Les cartes combinatoires sont un modèle combinatoire riche. Elles sont définies d’une manière intuitive et géométrique, mais elles sont aussi liées à des structures algébriques plus complexes. À la rencontre de différents domaines, les cartes peuvent être analysées par une grande variété de méthodes, et leur énumération peut aussi nous aider à compter d’autres objets combinatoires. Cette thèse présente un ensemble de résultats et de connexions très riches dans le domaine de l’énumération des cartes. Les résultats dans cette thèse se divise en deux grandes parties. La première partie contient mes travaux sur l'énumération des constellations, en utilisant les caractères du groupe symétrique ou bien en résolvant des équations fonctionnelles sur leur séries génératrices. La deuxième partie est sur le lien énumératif entre les cartes et d’autres objets combinatoires, par exemple les généralisations du treillis de Tamari et les graphes aléatoires qui peuvent être plongés dans une surface donnée.

https://www.irif.fr/~wfang/

Soutenances de thèses
vendredi 08 avril 2016, 10h00, Salle 2011, Sophie Germain
Charles Grellois (IRIF) Sémantique de la logique linéaire et model-checking d'ordre supérieur